All our Essay orders are Original, and are written from scratch. Try us today at 30% off

Linguis 3 CUI Linguistic problems discussion

Want answers to the assignment Below?

Text or Whatsapp Olivia at +1 (307) 209-4351


 

Linguis 3: Introduction to Linguistics Winter 2019 Problem Set 4: Syntax Due 2/15/2019. 91 points possible 1. For each pair of expressions below, say whether they belong to the same syntactic category or not and give an example supporting your answer. You do not have to say which syntactic category any of the expressions below belong to—just say whether they are the same or different and give evidence. (3 points each) a. seemed happy always seemed happy b. loud bar bar down the street c. extremely loud bar the bar d. slept all day liked e. quickly quite f. walked rode the bus 2. For each underlined expression below, say which syntactic category it belongs to and give one piece of evidence supporting your answer. (3 points each) a. Sally sent me a ​long annoying email. b. Sally sent me ​a long annoying email​. c. Sally sent me a ​long​ annoying email. d. Sally ​rides her bike​ fast. e. Sally ​rides her bike fast​. f. ​The writing of her latest novel​ took more time than anticipated. 3. Draw a phrase structure tree for each of the following expressions. (5 points each) a. thought Sally hated Bob. b. barked yesterday c. fell into the pond d. drifted slowly under the bridge e. this silly picture of Pat f. Chris loved Robin passionately. g. Pat pushed the stubborn horse into the barn. f. A student from my class claimed the teacher disliked him. 4. Consider the following example which shows the order of NPs and prepositions in Japanese PPs. (1) kono kodomo this child “with this child” to with (2) ​*​to kono kodomo a. Write a lexical entry for each word in the Japanese phrase in this example. (5 points) b. Write a phrase structure rule that allows the construction of PPs out of prepositions and NPs in Japanese. (5 points) c. Construct a phrase structure tree for the Japanese phrase ​sono hito to​ “with that person”. (5 points) Introduction to Linguistics Syntax I Semantics: How form relates to meaning. Syntax: Structure of sentences. Morphology: Structure of words words.. Phonology: Structure of sounds. Phonetics: How sounds are articulated. Basics Syntax • • Syntax is the study of the structure of sentences. • • • Phonemes combine to form morphemes. Morphemes combine to form words. Words combine to form sentences. Not so simple… A sentence expresses a complete meaning. • • A phoneme has no meaning. A morpheme is the smallest unit that expresses a meaning. From Phonemes to Sentences • • • Languages usually have around 25 different phonemes. • • Around 10,000-50,000 different morphemes. How many different sentences? • Unlimited. The meaning of every morpheme must be memorized. • If you’ve never heard the morpheme wug before, you can’t figure it out. The meaning of every sentence is predictable given the parts. • If you’ve never heard the sentence My hovercraft is full of eels before, you can still understand it. Compositionality • Sentences follow the principle of compositionality: the meaning of the whole is the meaning of the parts plus how they are combined. form “the cat sat on the mat” meaning Compositionality • Sentences follow the principle of compositionality: the meaning of the whole is the meaning of the parts plus how they are combined. • • • So, what are the parts? • Syntactic categories. And what are the ways that they are combined? • Syntactic rules. Of all the possible combinations of words, only a few form meaningful sentences. Grammar • In syntax, we categorize sequences of words as grammatical or ungrammatical within a language. • A mental grammar is a speaker’s unconscious knowledge of how a language works. • When you know a language, you know its rules: Phonological rules, morphological processes, syntactic rules, … /t/ z +/ – /æ _V ‘ / ] ʰ t +/ >[ /- d/ l ra m or /t of plu > to [æ ̃] fo rm /_ N pa st SYNTACTIC RULES te ns e Grammar • A sentence is grammatical in a language if it follows the rules in the mental grammar of that language. • A sentence is ungrammatical if it breaks those rules: that is, if it is something that people would not say. My hovercraft is full of eels. ✓ * Hovercraft of full eels my is. ✗ Prescriptive vs. Descriptive Grammar • When you learned “grammar” in school, you may have learned things like: • “Don’t end a sentence with a preposition” • • • • “Don’t use passive voice” “Don’t use less with a count noun, like less customers. You should say fewer customers.” This is prescriptive grammar: Someone’s ideas about what makes for “correct” or good writing. • Not our business as scientists! We’re interested in descriptive grammar: a description of the rules people actually do follow in normal language use. Grammaticality • A sentence is grammatical in a language if it follows the rules in the mental grammar of that language. • A sentence is ungrammatical if it breaks those rules: that is, if it is something that people would not say. • In studying syntax we will rely on grammaticality judgments: a speaker’s intuitive judgment about whether a sentence is grammatical or not. • If a sentence is grammatical we also call it well-formed. Syntax and Meaning • • Grammaticality is separate from plausibility! It doesn’t matter how nonsensical or false the meaning is, all that matters is that it follows the rules of the language. Colorless green ideas sleep furiously. ✓ Syntax and Meaning • • Grammaticality is separate from plausibility! It doesn’t matter how nonsensical or false the meaning is, all that matters is that it follows the rules of the language. ✓ Green sleep colorless furiously ideas. ✗ * Colorless green ideas sleep furiously. Syntax and Meaning • • Grammaticality is separate from plausibility! It doesn’t matter how nonsensical or false the meaning is, all that matters is that it follows the rules of the language. I have a friend who is always full of ideas, good ideas and bad ideas, fine ideas and crude ideas, old ideas and new ideas. Before putting his new ideas into practice, he usually sleeps over them to let them mature and ripen. However, when he is in a hurry, he sometimes puts his ideas into practice before they are quite ripe, in other words, while they are still green. Some of his green ideas are quite lively and colorful, but not always, some being quite plain and colorless. When he remembers that some of his colorless ideas are still too green to use, he will sleep over them, or let them sleep, as he puts it. But some of those ideas may be mutually conflicting and contradictory, and when they sleep together in the same night they get into furious fights and turn the sleep into a nightmare. Thus my friend often complains that his colorless green ideas sleep furiously. Syntax and Meaning • • Grammaticality is separate from plausibility! • A sentence is grammatical when it is something someone would say, no matter how unlikely the context! It doesn’t matter how nonsensical or false the meaning is, all that matters is that it follows the rules of the language. Grammaticality I bought a dog. ✓ * Me bought a dog. ✗ Grammaticality Sally ate an apple. Sally ate a tree. * Sally a tree ate. * Sally ate an exploded. ✓ ✓ ✗ ✗ Grammaticality Sally likes Bob. Bob likes Sally. * Likes Sally Bob. ✓ ✓ ✗ Grammaticality Sally will go to a store. * Sally has go to a store. Sally has gone to a store. * Store a Sally gone to has. ✓ ✗ ✓ ✗ Grammaticality France is in Europe. * France are in Europe. France is in Africa. ✓ ✗ ✓ Grammaticality This dog is mine. * This dog is my. This is my dog. * This is mine dog. ✓ ✗ ✓ ✗ Grammaticality ✓ Sally ate. ✓ Sally put the cup on the table. ✓ Sally put. ✗ * Sally ate the food. Syntactic Categories Syntactic Category • How do we describe what makes some sequences of words grammatical, and others ungrammatical? • The fundamental unit in syntax is the syntactic category. • Preliminary definition: Two words are in the same syntactic category iff you can interchange them in every sentence without making the sentence ungrammatical. • Alternatively: Two words are in different syntactic categories iff you can find a sentence where interchanging them makes a grammatical sentence ungrammatical. Syntactic Category • Example: Are cat and explode in the same syntactic category? • • • 1. Find a grammatical sentence containing cat. • I saw the cat. ✓ 2. Try substituting explode instead of cat. • * I saw the explode. ✗ 3. Therefore, cat and explode are in different syntactic categories. ➡cat is a noun (N), explode is a verb (V). Syntactic Category • Example: Are cat and mouse in the same syntactic category? • • • • 1. Find a grammatical sentence containing cat. • I saw the cat. ✓ 2. Try substituting mouse instead of cat. • I saw the mouse. ✓ 3. Are there any examples where it doesn’t work? 4. If no examples, then they are in the same syntactic category. ➡Both nouns (N). Syntactic Category • Example: Are Mary and mouse in the same syntactic category? • • • 1. Find a grammatical sentence containing Mary. • Mary is my friend. ✓ 2. Try substituting mouse instead of Mary. • * Mouse is my friend. ✗ 3. The substitution made the sentence ungrammatical, so they are in different syntactic categories. Syntactic Category • Example: Are the and my in the same syntactic category? • • • • 1. Find a grammatical sentence containing the. • Hand me the salt. ✓ 2. Try substituting my instead of the. • Hand me my salt. ✓ 3. Repeat the process. Are there any examples where it doesn’t work? 4. None, so they are in the same category. ➡ Both determiners (Det). Syntactic Category • Example: Are the and blue in the same syntactic category? • • 1. Find a grammatical sentence containing the. • I like the salt. ✓ 2. Try substituting blue instead of the. • I like blue salt. ✓ • 3. Repeat the process. Are there any examples where it doesn’t work? • How about the other way? • • • The blanket is blue. * The blanket is the. ✓ ✗ 4. The substitution made the sentence ungrammatical, so they are in different categories. • • Blue is an adjective. (Adj) The is a determiner. (Det) Syntactic Category: Not Just Words • • Syntactic categories cover more than just words! • Example: Are the cat and a dog in the same syntactic category? For any two sequences of words, if you can interchange them in all sentences without making the sentence ungrammatical, then they are in the same syntactic category. • • Start sentence: I think the cat is cute. ‣ I think a dog is cute. ✓ ✓ For any sentence you can think of that contains the cat, you can substitute a dog and it’s still grammatical. Syntactic Category • A syntactic category consisting of a sequence of words is called a phrase. • • The cat and a dog are in the same category: both are noun phrases (NP) Better definition: Two words or phrases are in the same syntactic category iff you can interchange them in every sentence without making the sentence ungrammatical. Syntactic Category • Example: Are dog and the cat in the same syntactic category? • • • 1. Find a grammatical sentence containing dog. • I have a dog. ✓ 2. Try substituting the cat instead of dog. • * I have a the cat. ✗ 3. The substitution makes the sentence ungrammatical, so they are not in the same syntactic category. ➡ Dog is a noun (N). ➡ The cat is a noun phrase (NP). Some Common Syntactic Categories • • • • • • • Nouns (N): cat, dog, car, water, salt, … • Verb phrases (VP): Anything that you can substitute with did so, do so, or does so. • Prepositional phrases (PP): Phrases like in the park Verbs (V): goes, went, runs, ran, … Adjectives (Adj): big, red, beautiful, angry, … Adverbs (Adv): quickly, fast, well, unfortunately, … Determiners (Det): a(n), the, this, that, those, my, your, … Prepositions (P): in, of, at, from, by, … Noun phrases (NP): Anything that can you can substitute with a pronoun (he, she, it, him, her, they, them). What is a sentence? • A sentence is a phrase that can appear in this context: • Sally thinks that ___________________. ‣ Sally thinks that the cat is cute. ➡the cat is cute is a sentence. ‣ *Sally thinks that the cat. ➡The cat is not a sentence. Syntactic Constraints Syntactic Constraints • The goal of syntax is to figure out what are the rules that make some combinations of words grammatical, and others ungrammatical? • Two kinds of constraints on words in sentences: • • Co-occurrence constraints • If you have one word somewhere in a sentence, you must also have another word somewhere else in the sentence. Word order constraints: • Words must be placed in a certain order for a sentence to be grammatical. Co-Occurrence Constraints Sally hasn’t read the book. * Sally hasn’t read the this book. * Sally hasn’t read three book. * Sally hasn’t read the. Sally hasn’t read three books. ✓ ✗ ✗ ✗ ✓ Co-Occurrence Constraints • • • Sometimes a word requires the presence of another word. • Sally hasn’t read the book. • *Sally hasn’t read the. ➡A determiner (Det) requires a noun (N). Sometimes a word rules out the presence of another word. •
The post Linguis 3 CUI Linguistic problems discussion first appeared on Assignment writing service.

  

Testimonials

Comes through every time

I have used this website for many times, and each time they found perfect writers for me and they produce...

Best Service

The book review I asked for is so amazing! Endless thanks to your team for completing my review and for...

Best

They look cool and trustworthy enough to me. I gather they made discounts as their prices are quite affordable if...

Great Job

Great job! Those were you, guys, who made my coursework perfect in time according to all my requirements. I will...

No Complaints So far Guys

Yeah …I really like all the discounts that they offer, the prices are very flexible. Plus they have different promotions...

Mh! not bad…

The worst part ever was to find my deadline postponed for 1 hour ! They couldn`t finish the essay within...

CLICK HERE  To order your paper

About Scholarfront Essay writing service

We are a professional paper writing website. If you have searched a question and bumped into our website just know you are in the right place to get help in your coursework. We offer HIGH QUALITY & PLAGIARISM FREE Papers.

How It Works

To make an Order you only need to click on “Order Now” and we will direct you to our Order Page. Fill Our Order Form with all your assignment instructions. Select your deadline and pay for your paper. You will get it few hours before your set deadline.

Are there Discounts?

All new clients are eligible for upto 20% off in their first Order. Our payment method is safe and secure.

 CLICK HERE to Order Your Assignment

 

ORDER WITH 15% DISCOUNT

Let your paper be done by an expert

Custom Essay Writing Service

Our custom essay writing service has already gained a positive reputation in this business field. Understandably so, all custom papers produced by our academic writers are individually crafted from scratch and written according to all your instructions and requirements. We offer Havard, APA, MLA, or Chicago style papers in more than 70 disciplines. With our writing service, you can get quality custom essays, as well as a dissertation, a research paper, or term papers for an affordable price. Any paper will be written on time for a cheap price.

Professional Essay writing service

When professional help in completing any kind of homework is all you need, scholarfront.com is the right place to get it. We guarantee you help in all kinds of academia, including essay, coursework, research, or term paper help etc., it is no problem for us. With our cheap essay writing service, you can be sure to get credible academic aid for a reasonable price, as the name of our website suggests. For years, we have been providing online custom writing assistance to students from countries all over the world, including the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, Italy, New Zealand, China, and Japan.